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Twitter Thursday

Resource Sharing #1

One of the educators I follow on Twitter on Larry Ferlazzo.  Larry is an ELL teacher from California and shares incredible resources for teaching ELL learners.  Nevertheless, all teachers can benefit from the valuable resources he shares.

On Tuesday, I stumbled upon this post on Twitter:

When I clicked on the link in his tweet and traveled to his website, I under-covered a wealth of valuable resources.  The webpage was filled with links to the posts that Larry thought were “his best” in October – I definitely recommend perusing the list and reading a few of the posts that pique your interest.  I was immediately drawn to “This Is Why I have Students Share Their Positive Stories.”  It wasn’t so much the content of that post that interested me.  Instead, it was the link to his “My Best Posts on Why It’s Important To Be Positive In Class.”  Contained on this website is an aggregated list of all Larry’s posts related to why it’s important to be positive in class.  I read a few of the posts he shared, and they are very inspiring.  One of the ideas that I want to implement during second quarter is the “Three Good Things” exercise.  You can read more about it here.

Resource Sharing #2

I recently came across this NPR article, Twitter “Saturday School” for Educators.

Here’s a snapshot of the story:

Every Saturday morning, nearly 200 educators join the online conversation #satchat. They say Twitter lets them instantly discuss issues like bullying, teacher recruitment and social media with colleagues outside their districts. Host Michel Martin talks with #satchat co-founder and New Jersey public school administrator Scott Rocco.

Listen to the 7 minute story from All Things Considered below.

I discovered #satchat in August, and since then, I have made it a habit to participate whenever possible.  Most of the time I find myself lurking in the background.  Through that process, I have learned so many new ideas, uncovered so many inspiring articles, and explored so many new EdTech tools.  Since #satchat is delivered via Social Media, educators can access the “archives” at anytime by searching #satchat.  If you don’t have a twitter account, click here to view the #satchat archive. If you want to learn even more about #sat, check out this great article from Edutopia by #satchat co-founder Scott Rocco.

As I have expressed before, Twitter is a fantastic form of professional development.  In particular, #Satchat is a great example of the power of social media to improve education, and the benefit of expanding an educator’s Personal Learning Network (PLN).  Let me know if you’re interested in getting started, and we can work together to help you get up and running.

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